Tag: Estate Planning Attorneys

Young Families’ Guide to Estate Planning During Summer Break

It is summer break! This is a time young families especially enjoy, but it can also be a time for young families to think about creating a Florida estate plan. This may seem to be a formidable task, but thinking about the peace of mind that comes from knowing your family’s future is secure is priceless. With that said, estate planning is critical for young families, especially when it comes to safeguarding the future of your children and knowing that your wishes are followed. Rest assured that by taking the time to plan now, you will be able to avoid unnecessary stress and confusion during times of crisis.

Were you aware that estate planning is more than just drafting a last will and testament or a trust agreement? It also involves making critical decisions about who will care for your children if you are unable to, how your assets will be managed and distributed, and who will make important medical and financial decisions on your behalf.  Below we want to share with you a young families’ guide to estate planning to assist you in being confident as you walk through this complex process to protect your family’s future.

  1. For your minor children, appoint a guardian. This is really one of the most important features of estate planning, appointing a guardian for your minor children. This person will have the responsibility of raising your children if you are unable to do so. By appointing a guardian now, you can be confident that your children are cared for by someone you trust, avoiding potential conflicts and uncertainty.
  2. For inheritance, think about a trust.  Often a direct inheritance can pose challenges for minors. When you work with your experienced Florida estate planning attorney to set up a trust, you can offer a structured way to manage and distribute assets. Why? Because trusts provide control over when and how your children receive their inheritance, safeguarding their financial future.
  3. For your health care, select a health care decision maker. If you become incapacitated, it is critical to have a health care decision maker already named in your estate plan. This trusted individual will make medical decisions on your behalf according to your wishes. Choose someone who understands your values and can advocate for your preferences regarding medical treatment.
  4. For your protection, be sure to create a durable power of attorney. Why? Because a durable power of attorney allows someone you trust to manage your financial affairs if you are unable to do so. In addition, your financial matters will be able to be handled without court intervention, maintaining continuity and stability. It is critical  for you to select a trusted individual to provide effective financial management for this role.
  5. For a trust-based estate plan, ask your attorney if you need one. Even though wills are common in estate planning, a trust-based estate plan offers more flexibility and control over asset distribution. Trusts can avoid probate, offer privacy, and be tailored to specific needs, providing a more efficient way to manage your estate. This approach allows your assets to be handled according to your wishes with minimal legal hurdles.
  6. For end-of-life care, be sure to document your wishes now. By using advance directives, such as living wills, you can outline your preferences for end-of-life care. This clear documentation enables your wishes to be followed, reducing stress and confusion for your family. This step is important for maintaining control over your medical treatment even when you cannot communicate your desires.
  7. For special needs, plan now. Do you have a child with special needs? Then it is essential to plan now for their long-term care and financial support. Establishing a special needs trust makes sure they receive proper care without jeopardizing their government benefits. This plan will secure your child’s future and provide peace of mind knowing they will be cared for.
  8. For beneficiary designations, review on a regular basis. Make a habit of regularly reviewing and updating beneficiary designations on life insurance policies, retirement accounts, and other financial assets. By keeping these designations current you can be confident that your assets are distributed according to your wishes, and it will also allow your estate planning attorney to incorporate them as a part of your plan. This is a simple yet crucial step in preventing unintended beneficiaries and potential disputes.
  9. For the unexpected, consider life insurance. Why? Because life insurance can provide financial security for your family in the event of your untimely death. It makes sure that your family can maintain their standard of living and cover expenses, such as education and housing. Adequate life insurance coverage is a key component of a comprehensive Florida estate plan which you can discuss with your attorney.
  10. For creating your estate plan, we highly recommend that you choose to work with an experienced Florida estate planning attorney. Navigating the complexities of estate planning is best done with professional guidance. An experienced attorney can help you understand legal intricacies, draft accurate documents, and tailor your plan to your family’s unique needs. Their expertise ensures your estate plan is thorough and legally sound.

Taking these steps during summer break can ensure your family’s future is secure. By designating guardians, setting up trusts, and working with an experienced estate planning attorney, you can create a comprehensive plan that provides peace of mind. Proactively addressing these ten tips will help you protect your loved ones and ensure their well-being no matter what the future holds.

We know this article raises more questions than it answers.  Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys, PA, is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Jupiter, as well as Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River Counties in Florida. Our law firm will guide you through legal challenges involving elder law, estate planning, trusts, veterans benefits, real estate, and more. We encourage you to contact us and schedule a meeting with our attorneys.

Key Estate and Elder Law Planning Tips You Need When Facing a Bone Cancer Diagnosis

Are you facing the challenges that come with a bone cancer diagnosis? We know that this diagnosis can be an overwhelming and challenging experience. As you go through the medical treatments and emotional stress, we gently remind you that it is important to be sure that your legal and financial affairs are in order. Why? Because when your estate and elder law plans are current you can have peace of mind knowing that the future is secure for you and your family. In the rest of our blog we have some key estate and elder law planning tips to assist you as you go through this process.

Do you have a Florida estate plan? Is it up-to-date? That is one of the first actions you should take after receiving a diagnosis of bone cancer; creating or updating your Florida estate plan. Your estate plan allows you to outline your wishes for the distribution of your assets and the care of your dependents. It is very important to regularly review and update your estate plan because then you will know that it remains aligned with your current situation and preferences. This process helps to prevent any potential disputes or confusion among your beneficiaries.

When it comes to your estate plan, communication with your family is good. If you are comfortable with this communication, consider having an open and honest conversation with your family about your goals and wishes. By having an open discussion you can help prevent misunderstandings and know that your loved ones are aware of your preferences. With your clear communication you can foster support and cooperation from your family members. You will be able to explain your goals for difficult topics. For example, asset distribution, care preferences, and any specific instructions you have. This will allow you to provide clarity that will help your family understand your decisions and support you in implementing your estate plan. In addition, involving your family in the planning process can help them feel more prepared and involved with your diagnosis.

Were you aware that the proper titling of your assets is another key aspect of an effective estate plan? It is. When your assets are titled correctly, you can prevent complications and know there will be a smooth transition of ownership. Sadly, incorrect or outdated titling can lead to unintended consequences and potential legal challenges. Be sure to make any necessary adjustments needed to align with your estate planning goals and avoid probate issues. Your Florida estate planning attorney will be able to help you identify and correct any discrepancies.

The time is now to begin considering the possibility of needing long-term care. This is another important part of your estate and elder law planning. Long-term care can include a range of services, from in-home care to assisted living facilities. By planning ahead you can avoid crisis-driven decisions and be sure that your care preferences are honored. We highly recommend that you choose to work with a Florida elder law attorney to discuss your long-term care options and preferences because they can help you make informed decisions. By planning now you can be sure that your care needs are met and that you have a plan in place to cover the associated costs including access to government benefits that may be much needed in the future.

We understand that going through the complexities of estate and elder law planning can be challenging, especially during a diagnosis of bone cancer. You need to know that an experienced Florida estate planning and elder law attorney can provide invaluable guidance and support. Their expertise can help you navigate the legal landscape with confidence. They can help you understand your legal options, draft and update essential estate planning tools, and create a comprehensive plan that aligns with your goals and needs. With their expertise you can be confident that your estate plan is legally sound and tailored to your unique circumstances. In addition, they can assist in making necessary adjustments as your situation evolves.

We know this article raises more questions than it answers.  Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys, PA, is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Jupiter, as well as Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River Counties in Florida. Our law firm will guide you through legal challenges involving elder law, estate planning, trusts, veterans benefits, real estate, and more. We encourage you to contact us and schedule a meeting with our attorneys.

How Errors in Your Florida Estate Planning Documents Can Derail Your Goals

Did you know estate planning is a critical process that ensures your assets are managed and distributed according to your wishes after your passing? It involves the preparation of various legal documents, such as last will and testaments, trust agreements, powers of attorney, and healthcare directives, each serving a unique purpose in safeguarding your legacy and providing for your loved ones. 

What you may not realize, however, is the effectiveness of your estate plan hinges on the accuracy and relevancy of these documents. Errors, outdated information, or non-compliance with Florida-specific laws can lead to significant complications, potentially derailing your carefully laid plans. Critical issues like these can result in increased legal costs, prolonged probate proceedings, unintended tax liabilities, and even disputes among your heirs. Understanding the common pitfalls in estate planning and proactively addressing them with the guidance of an experienced Florida estate planning attorney can help ensure your goals are achieved and your loved ones are protected. We want to dive into them right here on our blog.

  1. Documents not specific to Florida. Estate planning laws vary significantly from state to state. If your documents were created in another state and have not been reviewed or updated since you moved to Florida, they may not comply with Florida law. This can lead to unintended tax consequences, probate issues, or even the invalidation of your documents.

 

  1. Outdated documents. Estate planning documents that are over ten years old may no longer reflect your current wishes or financial situation. You need to know that changes in your family dynamics, such as marriages, divorces, births, and deaths, can all impact your estate plan. Additionally, the value of your assets may have changed, requiring updates to your distribution plans.

 

  1. Changes in the law. Laws governing estate planning are subject to change. If your documents have not been reviewed in several years, they may not take into account recent changes in the law. For example, changes in tax laws can affect the tax efficiency of your estate plan, and updates in probate law can impact how your assets are distributed.

 

  1. Death of a decision-maker. If a person named in your estate planning documents, such as an executor, trustee, or power of attorney, has passed away, your documents need to be updated to appoint a new decision-maker. Failure to do so can result in delays and complications in administering your estate.

 

  1. Incorrect or incomplete beneficiary designations. Errors in beneficiary designations on accounts like life insurance, retirement plans, and payable-on-death accounts can cause these assets to be distributed contrary to your intentions. Ensure that all beneficiary designations are correctly aligned with your estate plan.

To avoid these common pitfalls, it is essential to work with an experienced Florida estate planning attorney who can help ensure your documents are up-to-date and compliant with current laws. An attorney who specializes in Florida estate planning law will have the expertise to ensure your documents are compliant with state-specific requirements. Your attorney can review your documents, if you have them, and make necessary updates to your documents to reflect changes in your family, assets, or decision-makers.

By taking these proactive steps, you can help ensure that your estate planning documents accurately reflect your wishes and protect your loved ones. We know this article raises more questions than it answers.  Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys, PA, is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Jupiter, as well as Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River Counties in Florida. Our law firm will guide you through legal challenges involving elder law, estate planning, trusts, veterans benefits, real estate, and more. We encourage you to contact us and schedule a meeting with our attorneys.

7 Questions to Ask Your Elder Law Attorney

As we age, the legal and financial landscapes we must navigate become increasingly complex. Elder law is a specialized area of legal practice focusing on the needs of Older Americans and their families, dealing with everything from estate planning and financial management to long-term care planning and end of life challenges. Choosing to engage with an experienced elder law attorney can be pivotal in securing not only your assets but also your quality of life in later years.

Finding the right Florida elder law attorney for you involves knowing what questions to ask to ensure they understand your needs and can offer comprehensive solutions. These attorneys not only provide legal advice but also guide you through planning your long-term goals, managing your assets, and ensuring your wishes are upheld. With the right guidance you can prepare effectively for the future, avoiding common pitfalls and leveraging opportunities you may not have previously considered.

We know firsthand that navigating the complexities of elder law and estate planning can be challenging. Whether you are planning for your own future or helping an aging loved one, consulting with an elder law attorney can provide clarity and peace of mind. If you are wondering just where to start, let us share seven crucial questions to bring to your consultation as you begin thinking about the future.

  1. Do I need a durable power of attorney? A durable power of attorney is an essential part of your Florida estate planning. It allows you to appoint someone to make decisions on your behalf if you become incapacitated. Ask your attorney about the benefits of this planning tool and how it fits into your overall estate plan. When you plan forward you can ensure your financial affairs and long-term care decisions are in trusted hands.

 

  1. What is long-term care? Long-term care involves a variety of services designed to meet a person’s health or personal care needs during a short or long timeframe. These services help people live as independently and safely as possible when they can no longer perform everyday activities on their own. Understanding what constitutes long-term care in Florida and how to plan forward is crucial in planning for the future.

 

  1. How early should I plan for long-term care? Discussing when to start planning for long-term care is vital. Early planning can significantly impact the quality of care you or your loved one receives and the financial burden that comes with it. Your Florida elder law attorney can help you understand the timelines and the best strategies for early and effective planning.

 

  1. Is Medicare going to pay for long-term care? Many people assume that Medicare will cover all their long-term care needs, but this is not always the case. Medicare’s coverage of long-term care is quite limited. Your Florida elder law attorney can explain what Medicare covers and help you plan for the expenses that Medicare does not cover.

 

  1. What is Medicaid? Medicaid is a state and federal program that provides health coverage to millions of Americans, including eligible elderly adults and people with disabilities. In the context of elder law, it is crucial to understand how Medicaid can help cover long-term care costs, which are often not covered by Medicare.

 

  1. How do I plan for Medicaid eligibility? Planning for Medicaid eligibility is a complex process that involves understanding asset and income limits. It is important to ask your Florida elder law attorney about Medicaid planning strategies, which can help protect your assets while ensuring you qualify for benefits when you need them.

 

  1. How do I age in place safely? Aging in place refers to staying in the comfort of your own home as you age, rather than moving to a senior living facility or nursing home. Discuss with your elder law attorney about how to create a comprehensive plan that includes legal, financial, and community resources to support aging in place.

We know this article raises more questions than it answers. Asking the right questions during your consultation with a Florida elder law attorney can help ensure that your legal, financial, and healthcare needs are all addressed effectively. With their expertise, you can navigate the complexities of elder law with confidence, ensuring a secure and dignified future for yourself or your loved ones.

Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys, PA, is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Jupiter, as well as Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River Counties in Florida. Our law firm will guide you through legal challenges involving elder law, estate planning, trusts, veterans benefits, real estate, and more. We encourage you to contact us and schedule a meeting with our attorneys.

Does Medicare Cover the Expenses of Long-Term Care in Florida?

Are you finding that navigating the landscape of healthcare costs in senior years is not easy? In fact, as the population ages, there are more and more individuals requiring long-term care services. In addition, whether due to chronic illness, disability, or the natural progression of aging, long-term care needs can quickly become complicated and complex.

It is a fact that long-term care can be expensive. Often many of the seniors we meet with wonder if Medicare will help bear the brunt of these costs. Are you seeking answers to how to pay for the care you or a loved one may need? We have some important information to share on what Medicare covers and what it does not. We will also discuss why early planning with an experienced Florida elder law attorney is crucial.

We will begin with understanding Medicare basics. Medicare is a federal health insurance program primarily for individuals 65 and older and covers a broad range of healthcare services.  Medicare is divided into parts:

  • Part A (Hospital Insurance). This  covers inpatient hospital stays, skilled nursing facility care, hospice care, and some home health care.
  • Part B (Medical Insurance). Covers specific doctors’ services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services. Often you will hear of Part A and Part B referred to as Traditional Medicare. 
  • Part C (Medicare Advantage). A type of Medicare health plan offered by private companies that contract with Medicare. It provides all of Part A and Part B benefits.
  • Part D (Prescription Drug Coverage). This covers the cost of prescription drugs.

However when it comes to long-term care, Medicare’s coverage is limited. Even though Medicare Part A does provide coverage for care in a skilled nursing facility, it is important to note the limitations that apply to most situations:

  • Coverage is only for short-term stays (up to 100 days) in a skilled nursing facility, and only after a qualifying 3-day hospital stay.
  • It does not cover long-term stays or custodial care, which includes assistance with daily tasks like bathing, dressing, and eating.

If deemed medically necessary, Medicare can cover part-time or intermittent skilled nursing care and physical therapy. But again, it does not cover 24-hour care or purely custodial care as you would need in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Because of the limitations of Medicare when it comes to long-term care, it is vital for seniors to have an elder law financial strategy in place. Here are some concepts to consider:

  1. Research alternative options. Look into long-term care insurance, which is designed specifically to cover these costs. These policies can be tailored to your needs, but they are more affordable if purchased when you are younger and in good health.
  2. What about Medicaid? Unlike Medicare, Medicaid does cover long-term care services, but it is for individuals with limited income and assets. Proper planning can help seniors protect their assets while still qualifying for Medicaid.
  3. Find out about asset protection. Through trusts and other financial strategies, seniors can shield their assets from being completely depleted by long-term care costs.
  4. Meet now with an experienced Florida elder law attorney. Elder law attorneys specialize in helping seniors and their families navigate the complexities of long-term care, estate planning, and related financial matters. They can offer invaluable advice on protecting assets, qualifying for Medicaid, and ensuring that seniors receive the care they need.

The good news is that Medicare offers invaluable health coverage for seniors, but unfortunately its provisions for long-term care are limited. Because of the high costs of such care, seniors need to plan ahead as soon as possible and utilize the guidance of an experienced Florida elder law attorney who can help ensure that you or your loved one has access to the best care without the looming stress of exorbitant costs.

We know this article may raise more questions than it answers. Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys, PA, is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Jupiter, as well as Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie, and Indian River Counties in Florida. Our law firm will guide you through legal challenges involving elder law, estate planning, trusts, veterans benefits, real estate, and more. We encourage you to contact us and schedule a meeting with our attorneys.

4 Tips for Reviewing Your Florida Estate Plan During National Estate Planning Awareness Week

Did you know, during the third week of October every year we focus on National Estate Planning Awareness week? How familiar are you with estate planning in Florida? Did you know estate planning involves putting legal protections in place to help secure a future you want for yourself and your loved ones? Do you have a Florida estate plan right now but need to make sure it reflects what you need?

Many of our potential clients have estate planning that is years out of date. It does not reflect their goals for their:

• Decision makers for finances and health care
• The age or marital status of their children
• Is missing key beneficiaries such as grandchildren
• Does not reflect their disability needs
• Does not represent the legacy they wish to leave

Let us share four tips on how to review your Florida estate plan with your attorney on our blog.

1. Is it from Florida? While this may seem like an unusual question to begin with, your out of state estate plan may not work in Florida. Start by reviewing your plan to make sure that it was written and executed in Florida. After you determine the state of origination, look at the dates. Is it only a few years old? Or older? Laws change over time and you may need to work with your attorney to update it to reflect the current laws.

2. Does it consider your incapacity planning? Incapacity planning allows for considerations such as having someone you have selected assist you if you are unable to make decisions for yourself. The most important tools for incapacity planning include a Florida durable power of attorney, health care planning tools, and living will.

3. Does it reflect your goals for your legacy? Creating a legacy is what most of our potential clients who come to our firm are looking for. While the last will and testament may be the most common legal document for estate planning, there may be more flexibility to create the legacy you want through a trust agreement. What are your goals? Have they changed since you last created your estate plan?

4. Make a list of what you want, now. Your needs met change over time. They may have changed since you last created your Florida estate plan. Go ahead and make a list of what you want, now, and the changes you anticipate you will need to make. You can bring this list to your meeting with your estate planning attorney so that she can help you update your existing Florida estate plan or create a new one to reflect what you need.

Whether you schedule an appointment with our firm during the month of October or anytime throughout the year, our law firm is here to help you. We can guide you through your Florida estate planning options and update your existing plan to ensure it reflects what you want. Please do not hesitate to contact our office today to schedule a meeting with our experienced Florida attorneys.

Moving to a New State? Here are 3 Key Reasons Why You Need to Update Your Estate Plan

Did you move back to your home state during the pandemic after having lived away during college and afterwards? It may have been a move that you did not really plan for. If you have decided to stay, however, you should consider taking control now. Whether you are single and starting life anew, or you moved closer to family for help with your kids, it can be important to ensure you have a solid estate plan in place in your new home state. Let us discuss three reasons why.

1. You Should Have Estate Planning Documents Anyway. If you moved to a new state and you only had minimal estate planning in place, now may be the perfect time to execute documents in your new home state. Many young, single adults do not have formal estate plans. Those who are newly married or became parents during the pandemic often do not have them either, even if you have been meaning to get around to it. Now may be the perfect time. Consulting with a qualified estate planning attorney in your new state can help ensure you have everything you need in place.

2. You Should Consider a New Health Care Surrogate. If you did have an estate plan where you used to live, it is likely that you named a health care surrogate who lived in that state. Most states only allow you to choose a state resident for this purpose. If you had chosen a local friend, but you are now back living near family, you may want to update your choice of health care surrogate to someone you trust who lives near your new home.

3. You Should Name a Guardian for Minor Children. If you became a parent during the pandemic, you may not have had the chance to name guardians for your child yet. When you update your estate planning documents for your new state, you can choose someone for the task. If you already had kids, but you have moved to a new state, the people you had chosen previously may no longer be suited to the role if your intent was to keep your kids in your new location should you pass away. If you update your estate planning documents now that you have moved, you can consider who might be the best choice for keeping your kids in their new home and update your guardianship arrangements if that is necessary.

Do you have questions? Please contact our law practice to learn more. We are here for you. Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River Counties.

Woman of the Year Nominee, Anne’ Desormier-Cartwright

Did you know that Attorney Anné Desormier-Cartwright was recently honored as a Palm Beach North Chamber of Commerce 2020 Woman of the Year nominee? She is among 25 nominees that were selected from 50 nominations from the community. In a year where there were a record-breaking number of nominations for this highly sought after award, Attorney Desormier-Cartwright finds herself among the highest caliber of women in the Palm Beach North community.

The Woman of theYear award recognizes women for their outstanding leadership as well as their demonstrated commitment to the Palm Beach North Region. It should come as no surprise that Attorney Desormier-Cartwright finds herself among such prestigious company. Her dedication to the community and to excellence is clear in everything she does. In addition to being appointed to the Guardianship Education Committee for the Palm Beach County Bar since 1998, she also serves on the Probate and Guardianship Practice Committee of the Florida bar.

While excelling in her capacity as managing partner of Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA, Attorney Desormier-Cartwright is also a Charter member of Elder Counsel, which is a nation wide association of elder law attorneys who focus on how changes in the law impact the elderly. She remains dedicated to organizations that pave the way for both understanding and preparing legislation that impacts the elderly, such as the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys and Academy of Florida Elder Law Attorneys. Additionally, she has been a member of The Greater Palm Beach Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction for the past 30 years and has served on the Board of Directors.

Do you have questions about elder law or estate planning? Please contact our law practice to learn more. We are here for you. Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River Counties.

What are the Different Types of Trusts to Use in Estate Planning?

Trusts are an estate planning tool created for the management of assets, both during your life and after your death. Are there different types of trusts to use in estate planning? Yes, there are several types. They can, however, be divided into a couple of categories, which may make them much easier to understand. 

First of all, trusts can be either living or testamentary. Living trusts, also known as inter vivos trusts, are created while the trustor is still living. There are also testamentary trusts, which are created by a trustor after his or her death. 

Secondly, trusts are either revocable or irrevocable. In simplest terms, this speaks to whether or not they can be changed or revoked after they are created. There can be important legal implications of choosing between revocable or irrevocable. 

A revocable trust is created by a trustor, who also remains as the beneficiary until his or her passing, and then passes onto the successor trustee and beneficiaries. The easiest way to envision a revocable trust may be one created by a married couple, who remain as both co-trustors and co-beneficiaries until their passing and then, an adult child becomes the successor trustee and their other children, and possibly grandchildren, become the successor beneficiaries. A revocable trust can be revoked or changed at any time prior to the original trustor’s death. Accordingly, there are no tax benefits. Essentially, the revocable trust can function as a means of distributing assets to beneficiaries while avoiding the timely and costly probate process. 

As the name implies, once an irrevocable trust is created it cannot be changed, except under rather limited circumstances. Once the assets are transferred to the trust, they are no longer considered to be the property of the trustor, but rather, are the property of the trust. The benefits include limiting or eliminating both income and estate tax and usually the trust property cannot be reached by the trustor’s creditors. Another key draw of the irrevocable trust may be because the assets of the trust are no longer the property of the trustor, they are not considered, when determining the trustor’s eligibility for government programs, such as Medicaid, which can make them an integral tool in long-term care planning. Along the same lines, a special needs trust, which is most typically created to provide for an adult disabled child following the passing of their parents is most usually irrevocable, assuring the disabled child remains eligible for government programs. 

Now that you have an understanding of the fundamentals of trusts, it is a great time to meet with an estate planning attorney to discuss how best to meet your estate planning goals. Do you have questions? Please contact our law practice to learn more. We are here for you. Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River Counties.

Choosing the Right Estate Planning Attorney in Your Area

Does choosing the right estate planning attorney to help you create an estate plan seem like an overwhelming task? It can be understandable to feel like this. With these tips, however, it can be easier to narrow your choices to a few qualified attorneys in your area. Let us discuss these tips for choosing the right estate planning attorney in your area.

You might want to first start your search by asking your accountant or financial planner for recommendations. Estate planning can be a critical part of financial planning and money management. Drafting a will, a health care proxy, or power of attorney, as well as creating a trust, and maximizing your loved ones’ inheritances by minimizing taxes can all be important financial matters that often benefit from the specialized knowledge of an estate planning attorney. If your financial advisor and accountant have not already brought up estate planning, ask them who did their estate plan, and whether they would recommend their estate planning attorney.

You could also ask other attorneys for recommendations. You may have already worked with an attorney on another matter, perhaps setting up a business, buying a home, or reviewing a contract. Lawyers are often happy to refer their clients to other lawyers who practice in other areas of expertise, and they will want to refer you to good attorneys so that you will trust them again when you next need their assistance. Ask your former attorney who did his or her estate plan, and for references, so you can choose the right estate planning attorney in your area.

Contacting the state or local bar association may also be a good idea. State and local bar associations offer referral services or a searchable directory of attorneys with their practice areas. These services can make choosing the right estate planning attorney in your area as easy as a Google search. 

Your friends may also act as a solid referral source. While a staggering number of people do not have estate plans, there are many who do. Ask your friends if they have a will or a trust, and if so, who the attorney was that drafted it. Let friends know that you want to choose the right estate planning attorney in your area, and that you want to know if they worked with a great attorney. 

Do you have questions? Please contact our law practice to learn more. We are here for you. Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to provide service in Palm Beach, Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River Counties.