Tag: Caregiver

Should Your Parents Pay You For Being Their Caregivers?

“They spent their lives taking care of you. Now it’s your turn to take care of your aging parents as they need assistance with daily tasks. It’s either you or outsourcing to outside caregivers or nursing homes, which can be expensive.

So what if you provide care for your parents and they pay you instead?

Anne Desormier Cartwright of Elder & Estate Planning Attorneys PA says:
“”In some instances, the IRS considers a paid family caregiver an employee because the elder parent tells them what to do and then pays them for their work, similar to any job. Accordingly, the elder parent, or the family member, can then be responsible for a variety of taxes depending on the amount of wages paid.””

In Florida specifically, a personal services agreement may need to be entered into between the aging parents and the adult child. With the help of an experienced elder law attorney, this contract can prevent any amount of money being paid to the child to later be seen as a gift should the parents need to apply for public benefits programs such as Medicaid.

Elder and Estate Planning Attorneys PA is a law office small enough to provide personal service but large enough to handle all of your estate and planning needs. Do not wait to contact their office for support.”

How to Avoid Family Conflict When Shifting from Family Elder Care, to Paid Caregiving

Most elder caregiving is performed by close family members, but almost inevitably, there may come a time when even the most dedicated family caregivers have to make room for paid care services.

This can create conflict between family members and run the risk of detracting from an elder loved one’s quality of care and overall well-being. We are here to tell you that it does not have to.

Family conflict, particularly among adult children, often results from:

  • Sibling rivalries and prior family disputes
  • An inability to cooperate and make important shared decisions
  • Disagreements about an elder loved one’s health and financial concerns
  • Uneven distributions of paid caregiving responsibilities

Whether due to a diagnosable illness like Alzheimer’s Disease, a debilitating injury or just plain old age, paid caregivers are well-suited to deliver positive health care results. This does not mean, however, that transitioning away from family care is going to occur smoothly.

First, the lion’s share of family caregiving usually falls on one particular adult child. It is important for other siblings to recognize all that this entails, as letting go can be challenging.

Forgoing income-generating opportunities and basing social and personal commitments around an aging parent is an enormous sacrifice. When combining the rigors of meal preparation, assistance with bathing, dressing, transportation, and other daily activities, elder caregiving can be exhausting.

This has to be acknowledged and respected, even if it is the primary elder caregiver who now wants to pay for help, and possibly relief. Conversely, a primary caregiver should recognize and work through any resentments from adult siblings and family members about his or her volunteer care.

Even the most “functional” families may bring old baggage to the table when facing difficult elder care decisions, but issues will need to be resolved with the elder loved one’s best interests in mind. Clear communication and mature compromise is a requirement. If disputes persist, then consulting a third-party expert for impartial guidance can be extremely helpful. As elder law professionals we can offer advice on sensitive issues and provide a healthy way forward. Do not wait to let us know what help you and your loved one’s need.

Don’t Forget These Ways to Say “Thank You” to a Caregiver Over the Holidays

Fall is the season of giving back and being grateful for the people you have in your life. While many of us remember the last time we thanked our friends, family members, and other loved ones, do you remember when you last told your caregiver “thank you”?

This individual is constant in the life of your loved one, providing necessary care and support each and every day. We want to share five unique ways to remind the caregiver in your life that you are thinking of him or her and are appreciative of the work and care he or she is providing.

1. Say “thank you.”

Many of us think that showing thanks to someone requires a grand gesture or pricey gift. In reality, however, sometimes the smallest gestures have the greatest impact. Simply taking the time to say “thank you” to your caregiver lets him or her know that you recognize and are thankful for his or her hard work.

2. Remind them to take time for themselves.

Being a caregiver is a full-time role that often does not end when he or she goes home for the night. Every once in a while, encourage your caregiver to take the day off to spend time with his or her family or enjoy his or her hobbies. If you are worried about your loved one’s care needs being met, you may consider respite care options. This type of short-term relief can be utilized on an as needed basis, allowing your caregiver some time to recoup and regenerate.

3. Give them a small gift.

There is no need to spend a fortune to let your caregiver know you are thinking of him or her. An item as small as a keyring or notebook can be meaningful. Make it a surprise gift, or ask if they had their eye on anything in particular. Either way, it will be sure to put a smile on the caregiver’s face after a long day.

4. Offer a helping hand.

Sometimes, caregivers need help too. Whether it is helping with his or her yard work, cooking a meal, or just making yourself available to spend time with the loved one they are caring for can allow the caregiver to take a well-earned break that will benefit all of you.

5. Write a “thank you” letter or card.

Taking the time to put your thoughts and feelings into a handwritten card or letter can be especially meaningful. This is something your caregiver can look back on if they are in need of a boost and can show him or her that you care enough to spend the time crafting a thoughtful note of thanks.

How do you say “thank you” to your caregiver? We know how important it is for your loved one to be well-taken care of, but it is important that you take some time every now and then to let your caregiver know you appreciate him or her. Do not wait to contact our office if you need some additional unique ideas for ways to thank your caregiver during the holiday season and throughout the rest of the year.